Planet Rationalist

November 24, 2014

Fallacy Files

Sanity Check it Out

It's time once again to check the "sanity" of a number that, in this case, is found on some websites. Here is a quote from one such site....

Mon, 24 Nov 2014 03:00 Instapaperify

Slate Star Codex

Links 11/14: I Link, Therefore I Am

The American chestnut was once a contender for the most common tree in the country, by some accounts making up 25% of all trees in the Appalachian area and having a population of up to 3 billion. It was a vital mainstay of both the early US ecosystem and, through its wood and nuts, the early US economy. In the 1900s, a chestnutpocalypse caused by an invasive Asian fungus killed off 99.99% of them and left the species so close to extinct that the discovery of surviving single specimens can still make the news. Now a group claims they’ve genetically engineered a blight-resistant version and are holding a Kickstarter-style fundraiser to replant thousands of specimens all over the United States. Spend $100 and you can have your own American chestnut tree. Almost as cool as a pet passenger pigeon!

Almost Everything In Doctor Strangelove Was True, including the poor security around nuclear bombs, the ability of rogue commanders to initiate first strikes, and the Soviet auto-nuke doomsday device. Interesting less for the information ...

by Scott Alexander at Mon, 24 Nov 2014 01:57 Instapaperify

November 23, 2014

Shtetl-Optimized

Kuperberg’s parable

Recently, longtime friend-of-the-blog Greg Kuperberg wrote a Facebook post that, with Greg’s kind permission, I’m sharing here.


A parable about pseudo-skepticism in response to climate science, and science in general.

Doctor: You ought to stop smoking, among other reasons because smoking causes lung cancer.
Patient: Are you sure? I like to smoke. It also creates jobs.
D: Yes, the science is settled.
P: All right, if the science is settled, can you tell me when I will get lung cancer if I continue to smoke?
D: No, of course not, it’s not that precise.
P: Okay, how many cigarettes can I safely smoke?
D: I can’t tell you that, although I wouldn’t recommend smoking at all.
P: Do you know that I will get lung cancer at all no matter how much I smoke?
D: No, it’s a statistical risk. But smoking also causes heart disease.
P: I certainly know smokers with heart disease, but I also know non-smokers with heart disease. Even if I do get heart disease ...

by Scott at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:34 Instapaperify

Risk: Reason and Reality | Big Think

Risk Numbers Don't Lie, But They don;'t Tell the Whole Truth ither

A report from The Institute for Economics and Peace http://economicsandpeace.org/ offers some sobering news about the global rise of terrorist deaths. They’re up 61% from last year. Pretty scary. But the report, and the news coverage it has received, also teaches some ...

Read More

by David Ropeik at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:03 Instapaperify

Lund University Cognitive Science

LUCS at the conference Culture Brain Learning (CBL 2014)

LUCS took part in the Wallenberg Network Initiative conference Culture Brain Learning took Place in Lund, November 19-21.
Educational Technology Group (ETG) was presented in the talk by Daniel Schwartz, Stanford University, on the collaboration around novel generation educational software for early math featuring the two play-&-learn games: Critter Corral and Magical Garden.
The two play-&-learn games were also demonstrated on-line.
Educational Technology Group (ETG) and Lars Hall respectively also participated in the poster session.
> Watch ETG poster

- – -

From the Conference:

Presentation by Daniel Schwartz, Stanford University, on the collaboration around novel generation educational software for early math including two play-&-learn games: Critter Corral and Magical Garden.
- Contrasting standard educational apps with novel generation educational software in terms of informative feedback, scaffolding and support for learning processes.
- Discussing the gains in terms of socio-cognitive mechanisms + showing an example from Magical Garden research testifying how young children are better at focussing their attention when using Magical Garden compared to when performing standardized test of attentional capacities.
- Showing hard facts on educational gains from ...

by magnushaake at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 18:37 Instapaperify

CONTRARY BRIN

Peering at the Future...

This weekend's posting is mostly a potpourri of interesting miscellany. But we'll start and end with some items about... prophecy!

No, not reading tea leaves or goat entrails, but the kind that obsesses everyone from bureaucrats to corporate heads to school teachers to stock brokers to moms n' dads. Using those "lamps on our brows" -- our imaginative prefrontal lobes -- to poke a stick into the future we are running across, discovering opportunities and errors just in time.

I'll start with an item in the news.  Today -- very, very quietly -- the U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee finally issued its report on the tragic deaths of four American diplomats at the hands of terrorists in Benghazi, Libya.  The predictions about this report, touted for upwards of three years by Fox News and almost every Republican pundit and office-holder... (and many of you out there)... had been that the Obama Administration would be at-minimum revealed as incompetent and deceitful and more-likely criminally negligent cowards engaged in a Nixon-level illegal cover-up, possibly leading to ...

by David Brin at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 16:34 Instapaperify

Uploads by Singularity University

SU Summit Europe Day 2

We're here in Amsterdam it's the second day of SU Summit Europe. Yesterday was packed with all of these wonderful presenters talking to us about the exponential technologies. I'm sure today...
Views: 11
1 ratings
Time: 00:20 More in Science & Technology

by Singularity University at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 15:39 Instapaperify

Lifehacker

Avoid Being “Too Nice” to Avoid Needy People

Avoid Being “Too Nice” to Avoid Needy People

If you are nice to others, people will be nice to you. That's common sense. Sometimes though, being overly nice isn't always the best policy. We can attract the wrong kinds of people by being nice all the time.

Read more...

by Dave Greenbaum at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 15:00 Instapaperify

Mind Hacks

Wankers and prankers on the suicide hotline

CC Licensed Photo by Flickr user kev-shine. Click for source.The New York Magazine‘s new Science of Us section has an interesting review of a new documentary on hotlines – whether they be for suicide support or phone sex.

I was initially annoyed at the fact that the documentary puts both of these in the same category but it’s based on the interesting premise that hotlines – whether for mental health, sex or supporting members of a particular marginalised community – often involve the common component of lonely people reaching out to connect with a stranger, briefly, through conversation.

I don’t know how good the documentary is, I haven’t seen it, but interestingly the review was by an writer who himself had worked on a mental health support lines.

As a result the piece has some wonderfully insightful points about the emotional experience of working as a telephone support counsellor. I was really struck by this section:

Hotline mentions the masturbators, at least — cretins who call up and simply breathe heavily into their phones as they do their thing (at Samaritans, I never had ...

by vaughanbell at Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:32 Instapaperify

Marginal Revolution: Science

Claims about cetaceans (speculative)

…cetacean brain size, relative to body size, increased substantially about thirty-eight mill years ago when the odontocetes evolved from the ancient archaeocetes…

What drove these changes? It does not seem to have been the transition to an aquatic existence itself as that occurred about fifty-five million years ago and brains stayed at roughly the same relatively small size relative to body weigt as the archaeocetes made their gradual entry into the ocean.  A better hypothesis is that the increased brain size of the odontocetes thirty-eight million years ago was driven by the evolution of echolocation.  The early odontocetes had inner ear bones that were good at picking up high frequency sound, which suggests that they had developed a form of sonar.  Lori Marino thinks “that echolocation came on line and then got co-opted for social communicative purposes.”  In this scenario, the odontocete brains increased in relative size to deal with the acoustic information itself, as well as, perhaps, a new perceptual system based on the data from the returning echoes.  But…the change may have ...

Sun, 23 Nov 2014 07:13 Instapaperify

November 22, 2014

Slate Star Codex

OT9: The Thread Pirate Roberts

This is the semimonthly open thread. Post about anything you want, ask random questions, whatever. Also:

1. You remember that time I tried to explain fashion using cellular automata, referencing hipsters in particular? A recent Washington Post article highlights the work of a prestigious French mathematician who is trying to explain fashion using cellular automata referencing hipsters in particular. And from the Post article, even our specific automata look very similar in being vertical four-cell-tall columns that display alternating loop behavior – although his runs on kinda different rules than mine does. Probably a coincidence, unless any of you want to fess up to being prestigious French mathematicians. But it’s nice to have some independent confirmation.

2. Comments of the month: JayMan disagrees with me on the genetics of divorce (1, 2), a terrible pun on divorce, F&C discusses a really interesting idea for a NaNoWriMo novel, and Nate Gabriel one-ups my discussion of whales, gender, and the Bible with a story about Biblical whale gender that I would not have believed if it ...

by Scott Alexander at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 20:27 Instapaperify

Dan Ariely

Ask Ariely: On the Black Friday Binge

Dear Dan,

Thanksgiving is around the corner, including Black Friday, the largest shopping day of the year, when many people spend way too much money. How do we stop this insanity?

—John

People do spend a lot of money on Black Friday, but is that really so irrational? To figure that out, we need to ask which state of the world we should compare this tradition to. If you assume that we could get people to blow less money on Black Friday and decrease overall irresponsible spending, then of course the world would be a better place without Black Friday.

But what if canceling Black Friday just spurred people to start living beyond their means every month of the year? And what if this extra increase in monthly splurging turned out to be larger than the spending increase on Black Friday itself? If all this were true, we would be better off with Black Friday.

Let’s think about dieting as an analogy for shopping. Many diets allow for a “cheat day” because they realize ...

by danariely at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 19:56 Instapaperify

Mind Hacks

Explore our back pages

At our birthday party on Thursday I told people how I’d crunched the stats for the 10 years of mindhacks.com posts. Nearly 5000 posts, and over 2 million words – an incredible achievement (for which 96% of the credit should go to Vaughan).

In 2010 we had an overhaul (thanks JD for this, and Matt for his continued support of the tech side of the site). I had a look at the stats, which only date back till then, and pulled out our all time most popular posts. Here they are:

topten

Something about the enthusiasm of last Thursday inspired me to put the links the top ten posts on a wiki. Since it is a wiki anyone can jump in and edit, so if there are any bits of the mindhacks.com back catalogue that you think are worth leaving a placeholder to, feel free to add it. Vaughan and I will add links to a few of our favourite posts, so check back and see how it is coming along.

Link: Mind Hacks ...

by tomstafford at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:55 Instapaperify

PsyBlog

Andrew Gelman

Blogs > Twitter

Tweeting has its virtues, I’m sure. But over and over I’m seeing these blog vs. twitter battles where the blogger wins. It goes like this: blogger gives tons and tons of evidence, tweeter responds with a content-free dismissal.

The most recent example (as of this posting; remember we’re on an approx 2-month delay here; yes, this site is the blogging equivalent of the “slow food” movement), which I heard about on Gawker (sorry), is Slate editor Jacob Weisberg, who took a break from tweeting items such as “How Can You Tell if a Designer Bag Is Fake?” to defend serial plagiarist Fareed Zakaria:

Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 1.22.44 AM

(Just to interject: to say that Zakaria is a serial plagiarist is not to say he has nothing to offer as a journalist. Plagiarists ranging from Martin Luther King to Doris Kearns Goodwin to Laurence Wayne Tribe have been functional members of society when not copying the work of others without attribution. (OK, I’m kidding about that “Wayne” thing; I just thought Tribe needed a middle name too ...

Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:53 Instapaperify

mathbabe

Aunt Pythia’s advice

Greetings, friends! I’ve missed you all!

Since returning from her travels, Aunt Pythia has been continuously marveling in the wonders of flannel and wool, and has decided to knit up something along these Celtic lines:

Is that not gorgeous?

Is that not gorgeous? I love the tangled-upedness of the center. And, of course, the doubly rainbow-ic aspects.

Here’s the thing, though: the pattern comes from the excellent book Celtic Charted Designs that Aunt Pythia is absolutely sure she has somewhere in her house, but can’t find. in fact she’s spent the good part of the morning searching her house. So if the column is a wee bit short and/or frustrated today, you’ll know why.

On to business! Aunt Pythia has lots of questions to answer, given that she was away last week, and she’s eager to get through some. But before she forgets,

please think of something Celtic

to ask Aunt Pythia at the bottom of the page!

By the way, if you don’t know what the hell Aunt Pythia is ...

by Cathy O'Neil, mathbabe at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:48 Instapaperify

Overcoming Bias

Hanson Loves Moose Caca

In the movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” when Toula was a little girl, she sat alone in the school cafeteria, frizzy haired, big nosed, and unpopular. The blonde girls at the next table asked her what she was eating, and Toula quietly said “moussaka.” The popular girls laughed cruelly, saying “Ewwww, ”moose caca!”” (more)

Imagine that those cruel girls had gone on to tell other kids “Toula says she loves to eat moose caca!” That is how I feel when Noah Smith says:

Why is it that the sciences look like a feminist nirvana compared with the economics profession, which seems to have a built-in bias that prevents women from advancing?

Consider this 2011 blog post by George Mason University economist Robin Hanson. Hanson writes that “gentle, silent rape” of a woman by a man causes less harm than a wife cuckolding her husband:

I [am puzzled] over why our law punishes rape far more than cuckoldry…[M]ost men would rather be raped than cuckolded…Imagine a woman was drugged into unconsciousness and ...

by Robin Hanson at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:40 Instapaperify

Dan Ariely

Ask Ariely: On Erasing Email and Placebo Performance

Here’s my Q&A column from the WSJ this week  and if you have any questions for me, you can tweet them to @danariely with the hashtag #askariely, post a comment on my Ask Ariely Facebook page, or email them to AskAriely@wsj.com.

______________________________________________________

Dear Dan,

Recently, the German auto maker Daimler gave employees the option of automatically deleting all emails that arrive while they’re on vacation. Senders get a note suggesting that they resend their email later or write to other colleagues who are still in the office. This way, employees don’t have to face overflowing inboxes when they return. Is this a good idea?

—Kathleen

Not having to worry about email while you’re on vacation sounds wonderful, and this policy will probably boost employees’ well-being—though, of course, some will still wonder what they might have missed.

That said, the Daimler approach seems pretty extreme, and it deals with the symptoms rather than the root problem. In my experience, email stresses people out constantly, not just during vacations ...

by danariely at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 12:00 Instapaperify

Andrew Gelman

50 shades of gray goes pie-chart

Rogier Kievit sends in this under the heading, “Worst graph of the year . . . horribly unclear . . . Even the report doesn’t have a legend!”:

worst

My reply:

It’s horrible but I still think the black-and-white Stroop test remains the worst visual display of all time:

What’s particularly amusing about the Stroop image is that it does have color—but only in its label!

But I hate to start off the weekend on such a downer, so let me point you to a much more delightful infographic (link from Arthur Charpentier):

fruits

Aahhhh, much better.

The post 50 shades of gray goes pie-chart appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Sat, 22 Nov 2014 01:43 Instapaperify

Cal Newport » Blog

Deep Habits: Spend Three Months On Important Projects

king-480

A Productive King

In 2013, during a period of only three months, Stephen King published two full-length novels: Joyland and Doctor Sleep. This is unusually productive, even for a writer whose published fifty-five novels in his career (and sold over 350 million copies along the way).

Perhaps to celebrate this pinnacle of systematic wordsmithing, the Barnes & Noble book blog published a list of twenty tips extracted from King’s 2000 professional memoir, On Writing.

Nestled half way through this list was a piece of advice that caught my attention:

“The first draft of a book—even a long one—should take no more than three months, the length of a season.”

This tip resonates with my experience well beyond just book writing. Things worth doing take time, but if they take too much time your intensity might begin to wane to unproductive levels.

A period of three months seems just about right to hit that sweet spot where you’re accumulating enough deep work to produce something remarkable, but not so much time that your ...

by Study Hacks at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 01:36 Instapaperify

FORA.tv - Program Feed

Vernon Bogdanor: The General Election of 1945

Vernon Bogdanor: The General Election of 1945
The 1945 general election saw the return of the first ever majority Labour government. The Gallup poll had shown a Labour lead for over two years. Nevertheless most politicians and commentators were astonished by the result, since they expected that the war hero, Winston Churchill, would be returned to office by a grateful nation. In the event there was a swing of around 12% to Labour. How is this to be explained? Did the war radicalise the British people? Was the outcome a mandate for socialism? Or was it merely a reaction against the politics of the inter-war years? The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/the-general-election-1945 Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from ...

Sat, 22 Nov 2014 01:17 Instapaperify

Jagjit Chadha: From Gold to Paper and Back Again

Jagjit Chadha: From Gold to Paper and Back Again
Money was linked historically to the value of commodities such as gold in order to help preserve its value and encourage its wide and ongoing use. There are many examples of countries temporarily delinking from commodity standards. This lecture will explore the consequences of tying monetary value to commodities and why there are better choices for a government than a commodity standard. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/from-gold-to-paper-and-back-again Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0700
Location: , , Gresham College
Program and discussion: http ...

Sat, 22 Nov 2014 01:01 Instapaperify

Ian Morison: Are We Alone?

Ian Morison: Are We Alone?
A discussion of the prospects of finding life, simple or intelligent, beyond our own planet. There is the possibility of finding evidence of life, past or present, on Mars or even below the icy crust of Jupiter's moon Europa. By observing the infra-red spectra of the atmospheres of planets in nearby solar systems we might even find evidence of simple life forms. Beyond our local galactic environment our only chance is to intercept a signal from another intelligent race - SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence - a search in which the lecturer played a role in what has been the most sensitive search ever undertaken, Project Phoenix. Finally, Professor Morison will give his own thoughts about how likely our quest will be achieved. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/are-we-alone-the-search-for-life-beyond-the-earth Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week ...

Sat, 22 Nov 2014 00:47 Instapaperify

Christopher Clark: Sleepwalkers

Christopher Clark: Sleepwalkers
This lecture explores new ways of understanding the crisis that brought war to Europe in the summer of 1914; reflects on some of the problems of interpretation that have dogged the debate over the war's origins; and considers the contemporary resonance of a catastrophe that is now nearly a century old. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/sleepwalkers-how-europe-went-to-war-in-1914 Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0700
Location: , , Gresham College
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2014/09/29/Christopher_Clark_Sleepwalkers







Sat, 22 Nov 2014 00:29 Instapaperify

Jane Caplan: Distinguishing Marks The Tattoo

Jane Caplan: Distinguishing Marks The Tattoo
Tattoos are one of the 'distinguishing marks' specified in police descriptions, and long recorded on British passports. They have also often been seen as a form of writing on the body that conveys deeper messages about the bearer's identity, especially for criminals. This lecture will discuss the original debates about the tattoo as a sign of criminal identity among 19th century European police and criminal anthropologists. It will conclude the series with some final reflections on the subjective and objective dimensions of identity and identification covered by these lectures. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/speaking-scars-the-tattoo Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http ...

Sat, 22 Nov 2014 00:16 Instapaperify

Lifehacker

Avoid Accumulating "Truth Debt" by Comparing Honesty with Money

Avoid Accumulating "Truth Debt" by Comparing Honesty with Money

It can be easy to lie—especially when you're trying to stay out of trouble or avoid confrontation—but it can catch up with you. If you have trouble sticking to the truth, imagine each lie you tell as a charge on an imaginary truth credit card.

Read more...

by Patrick Allan at Sat, 22 Nov 2014 00:00 Instapaperify

November 21, 2014

FORA.tv - Program Feed

Jane Caplan: Names

Jane Caplan: Names
Why start with the personal name? Because we all have one: the personal name is the universal accompaniment to living in human society. Our name encapsulates our identity for ourselves and others; it is the bedrock of almost all forms of ID. Although we probably feel that our name 'belongs' to us, names have also been the target of considerable legal regulation in certain times and places. The regulation of names in Nazi Germany will be included. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/whats-in-a-name-more-than-you-might-think Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 03:00 ...

Fri, 21 Nov 2014 23:51 Instapaperify

Rev. Lucy Winkett: Faith in Women?

Rev. Lucy Winkett: Faith in Women?
Walk into any church or cathedral today and you might hear women singing, preaching, praying publicly. In a society where the relevance of the church is constantly questioned, has this change made any difference and does it matter? The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/faith-in-women-the-changing-role-of-women-and-girls-in-the-church Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 03:00:00 -0700
Location: , , Gresham College
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2014/06/24/Rev_Lucy_Winkett_Faith_in_Women







Fri, 21 Nov 2014 23:20 Instapaperify

Jane Caplan: Identity and Identification

Jane Caplan: Identity and Identification
You may know who you are, but how do I know? Looking at how this question has been answered in the past will focus on the emergence of modern ID. The concepts of identity and identification, will be defined in terms who we are to ourselves, subjectively; and who we are to others, objectively. Conventional elements of identity documents will be considered, to see how they have been regulated and used. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/identity-and-identification Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege
Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2014 03:00:00 -0700
Location: , , Gresham ...

Fri, 21 Nov 2014 23:11 Instapaperify

Risk: Reason and Reality | Big Think

GMO Food Labeling. Go For It, Food Companies. Your Fear of Fear May Be Excessive.

Companies fear, and GMO opponents hope, that labels on food will scare consumers away. But more and more research indicates that isn't what happens.



Read More

by David Ropeik at Fri, 21 Nov 2014 22:14 Instapaperify

Bulletproof

Steven Kotler: Extreme Flow States for Humans & Dogs – #173

Steven Kotler is an award-winning journalist and author of multiple New York Times Best-sellers, including The Rise of Superman and Abundance, and co-founder of the Flow Genome Project. Steven is one of the world’s foremost experts on flow states and human performance, and has been featured in leading publications such as TIME, Wired, Forbes, and […]

by Dave Asprey at Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:41 Instapaperify

FORA.tv - Program Feed

STORYSELLING

STORYSELLING
A conversation with Michael Roth, Chairman/CEO, Interpublic Group about trends in global ad spending, the evolution of mobile advertising, the outlook for native advertising and branded content, and the impact of data and programmatic buying on ad creative. Moderated by Maria Bartiromo, Anchor and Global Markets Editor, FOX Business Network.
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 09:05:00 -0800
Location: New York, New York, Paley Center for Media, Paley Center for Media
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2014/11/21/storyselling







Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:23 Instapaperify

NEW MODELS FOR NEW STORIES

NEW MODELS FOR NEW STORIES
A conversation with Jon Avnet, Rodrigo Garcia, and Jake Avnet, writers/directors/producers, WIGS and Indigenous Media and Jon Miller, Chairman, Indigenous Media on creating a business model for producing and financing premium long-form digital entertainment content. Moderated by Rich Greenfield, Media & Tech Analyst, BTIG.
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:30:00 -0800
Location: New York, New York, Paley Center for Media, Paley Center for Media
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2014/11/21/new_models_for_new_stories







Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:16 Instapaperify

STORYTELLING IN A POST-ADVERTISING WORLD

STORYTELLING IN A POST-ADVERTISING WORLD
A conversation with Brian Terkelsen, CEO, MediaVest and Warren Leight, Executive Producer, Law & Order: SVU, NBC about the creative and business challenges and opportunities presented by the rise of ad-free subscription streaming platforms. Moderated by Joe Marchese, CEO, true[X].
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:00:00 -0800
Location: New York, New York, Paley Center for Media, Paley Center for Media
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2014/11/21/storytelling_in_a_post_advertising_world







Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:09 Instapaperify

NEWS IN A POST-ADVERTISING WORLD

NEWS IN A POST-ADVERTISING WORLD
A conversation with Jim Bankoff, CEO, Vox Media and Jonah Peretti, Cofounder/CEO, BuzzFeed about building digitally native media companies on digitally native business models. Moderated by Felix Salmon, Senior Editor, Fusion.
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 07:30:00 -0800
Location: New York, New York, Paley Center for Media, Paley Center for Media
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2014/11/21/news_in_a_post_advertising_world







Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:06 Instapaperify

QuantifiedSelf

Bryan Ausinheiler: Diet and Digestion

BryanA_stool2

Bryan Ausinheiler was experiencing gastrointestinal issues for years and decided it was time to figure out what was causing it. By precisely controlling his diet – eating exactly the same quantities at exactly the same time – for a month and then measuring the quality of his stool in a self-designed spreadsheet he was able to create a baseline dataset to better understand his issues. Bryan then developed an experimental protocol that included “elimination and diet variations to figure out the cause of my frequent (3-5x/day) loose stools.” It turns out that “eating too many sunflower seeds was the main culprit.” Watch Bryan’s fascinating talk, presented at the Bay Area QS meetup group, to learn more about his process, and how he tackled self-experimentation and data collection.

The post Bryan Ausinheiler: Diet and Digestion appeared first on Quantified Self.

Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:57 Instapaperify

The GiveWell Blog

Deworm the World Initiative (led by Evidence Action) update

Summary

The Deworm the World Initiative (DtWI), led by Evidence Action, received approximately $2.3 million as a result of GiveWell’s recommendation last year. While there were some deviations, it largely allocated these funds as we expected.

DtWI now has limited room for funding; it is currently seeking to raise an additional $1.3 million to support its activities in 2015 and 2016. We expect it to allocate approximately 30% of the additional funds it receives for work related to expanding school-based, mass deworming programs and funding related operating expenses (including impact evaluation related expenses), and will allocate other funds to priorities that are less directly connected to expanding and evaluating deworming programs (investigating ways to combine other evidence-based programs with deworming rollouts, supplementing a project supported by another funder).

We currently expect to release updated recommendations by December 1st. We think it is likely that the Deworm the World Initiative will remain on our top charities list.

How did DtWI spend the money it received due to GiveWell, and how does this compare ...

by Elie at Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:40 Instapaperify

zen habits

Overwhelmed & Rushed? Do a Stress Assess

By Leo Babauta

If you find yourself rushing from task to task, worried that you don’t have time to do everything …

If you are feeling a high amount of stress and are just overwhelmed by the number of things you have to do …

You might try doing a Stress Assess.

It’s something I just did for myself, because I woke up and had a million things to do, and another million things swarming around in my head. I lay there in bed for 20 minutes, just thinking of all the things I needed to do, and some problems that were stressing me out.

And then I decided to make a list: everything in my life that’s on my mind or causing me some stress. My projects, but also little requests and financial tasks and personal problems that need my mental space. It was great to have the list written out, so I could see everything instead of having them all swirl around in my head.

Once I had a list, I made ...

by zenhabits at Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:34 Instapaperify

99U

Why Community Managers Are the New Brand Managers

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Whereas brands used to push their products and messages out in what was essentially a one-way conversation, the social web has transformed it into a two-way conversation. Which means that we have to learn to speak authentically and honestly to our customers, and that we can’t hide when we make mistakes.

To learn how to deftly navigate this new dynamic, we chatted up one of the most talked-about brands on the social web—Warby Parker, the eyeglasses-cum-lifestyle brand that has been a mad success from day one. Here, co-founder and co-CEO Neil Blumenthal breaks down how to be okay with leading a brand that you can’t totally control:

Where do you think brands go wrong when they’re trying to build an authentic relationship with customers? 
People have extremely sensitive BS detectors these days. We’ve all been inundated with advertisements since we started walking and talking. So we can pick up on a brand’s authenticity—or fakeness—immediately. As a brand, you can only engender trust if you’re being transparent ...

by behanceteam at Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:00 Instapaperify

Mind Hacks

Spike activity 21-11-2014

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news:

Wall Street Journal on The Future of AI: An Ubiquitous, Invisible, Smart Utility.

A list of the 100 most followed psychologists and neuroscientists on Twitter compiled by the BPS Research Digest. And a mixed bag it is too.

Student Science has a fantastic how-to on how to build a sensory homunculus based on data from your own body.

Is There a Link Between Mental Health and Gun Violence? asks The New Yorker. Next to bugger all, says the research.

Neuroskeptic has an interesting post on how brain structure – behaviour findings might not replicate in brain scanning. Lots of good comments.

Pavlov. What an asshole. The New Yorker covers the little known story behind a psychology legend.

When Bad Things Happen in Slow Motion. Is there more to our experience of time than the foibles of memory? asks Nautilus magazine.

Science reports on a new finding of a genetic link to male homosexuality.

Interesting New Scientist piece on how altering the auditory feedback from our ...

by vaughanbell at Fri, 21 Nov 2014 16:34 Instapaperify